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It is true that, in a more advanced stage of knowledge, a much better arrangement may be devised ; still it opens to our view a striking prospect of the wide extent of Glosso- logy, and casts into shade the acquisitions of Mithridates in ancient, or Mezzofanti in modem times; though the former is recorded to have spoken with facility tvxnty-tvco languages, and the latter, whom I heard with admiration, six-and-twenty years since, among his scholars at Bologna, was then said to have acquired thirty-five. modifications of Speech into Tribes, each tribe into Stocks, each stock into Branches, each branch into Divisions, each division into Languages, and certain languages into Dialects. " We cannot speak too highly in its praise .”— Literary Oazett*. i CA ||| Vittorio Hmanuele 111 || Cabinet Edition of the Encyclopaedia Metropolitan— continued. So far, my researches will be directed to matters of fact ; but as many • Univ. To this deservedly-eminent Glossologist great i praise is due, not only for his 4 Grammatisch-kritisches Worterbuch der hochdeutschen Mundart' one of the most complete Dictionaries ever published in any language, but for his 4 Mithridates,’ compre- hending notices of all the then known languages in the world, arranged according to their localities. 5 and necessary ; and secondly, that the new terms should, as far as possible, be analogous to those previously applied to the art in question. The Classification of Languages, Dialects, or Idioms, with a ciassiaev view to their scientific arrangement in Glossology, may be said to be Uoa ' as yet in its infancy. Latham, in his very able and popular work on ‘ the English Language,’ divides all the actua.

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Previously, however, it will be necessary to notice another main distinction, which depends on the history of language. Much the same may be said of the terms Stock and Branch.

" Full of Information, expressed in the choicest language. Vo L X., price 5s., cloth lettered, MORAL AND METAPHYSICAL PHILOSOPHY. His apology for these novelties in nomenclature is, “ that when unnamed additions are made to the system and detail of an art, terms must be invented for them.” This is undoubtedly true ; but then two requisites should be observed : first, that the additions should be indisputably accurate * Univ.

This learned person has also introduced several other terms quite new, so far as my reading goes, to the science of Glossology ; such as “ the Wave of the voice,” the “ Median Stress,” “ the Thorough Stress,” “ the Drift, of the Voice,” “ the Drift of the downmard vanish,” “ the Drift of vanishing stress,” &c.

Domingo ; but every other trace of the language has disappeared. -s' s'- ya, and the Doric transposition xdprttrrut for tpa rtaroi.

The original name Haiti has been restored to the island named by the Spaniards His- paniola, or St.

The early chapters of this treatise will be confined to the examination of spoken language ; afterwards, I shall notice the different systems of written language. But in the early part of the present century, the elder Adelung estimated their number at above three thousand, viz., 587 European, 937 Asiatic, 276 African, and 1264 American, besides very many either wholly lost, or extant only among barbarous and inaccessible tribes. For these reasons, although, in an advanced stage of glossological science, a more philosophical ar- rangement than by localities may reasonably be expected, yet, in the following sketch, I shall keep in view the divisions of Adelung into the Asiatic, European, African, and American tongues, with occasional reference to Vater and other sources. He distinguishes them into, 1 st, the Basque, Iberian, or Euskarian ; 2nd, the Finnish, Jotune, or Ugrian ; 3rd, the Celtic, comprehending the Welsh, Gaelic, Erse, and Breton ; 4th, the Latin and Greek, with their offspring, the Italian, French, Spanish, Portuguese, and modem Greek ; 5th, the Western branch of the Germanic, Teutonic, or Gothic, including High and Low German, Frisic, Anglo-Saxon, and English ; 6th, the Northern branch, or Scandinavian, comprising the Islandic, Norwegian, Swedish, and Danish; 7th, the Sclavonic, viz., Russian, Illyrian, Polish, Wendish, & c. It is equally known that each of their derivative tongues has been separately treated with great ability by numberless Glossologists ; but it is only of late years that the comparative Grammar of them all, including the Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, French, Provencal, Daco- Romanic (or Wallachian), and Rhcetish, lias been brought into one general view by Raynouard* and Diez.* 12. Bos worth, German ami the German and Scandinavian, were first brought under comparative Scaildi " avl ‘ m examination in the last century by Hickes,* Wachtkr,® and Iure,® with much industrious research into the older Eurojiean dialects, but without that knowledge of the Asiatic tongues which has contributed to the more accurate views of recent Glossologists, particularly of Grimm,® Graff , 7 Kai.tschmidt , 8 and Dikffenbach . The Celtic branch has been illustrated by many -writers, both of Ceiu^ the last and present century.

Hence there are two arts, the vocal and the graphic, which require to be treated differently. Prior to the last age, few j K-rsons knew, or considered, whether the different modes of speech employed throughout the world could be reduced to any certain number ; much less, whether they could be arranged and classed in any rational order. Indeed, whatever classification may be adopted at present, the different gradations will be found to be intermixed and connected with each other by such various analogies, that any positive arrangement of them would be liable to perpetual disturbance. Bosworth’s interesting work on 4 The Origin of the English, German, and Scandinavian Languages’ (1848). In reviewing these, the classical Latin and Greek seem to Latin and claim the first notice ; but it will lie unnecessary to dwell much on Gre * k - them, as the literary discussions to which they have for several cen- turies given rise are well known.

D., Lecturer on Botany at the original School of Medicine, Dublin. " Perhaps the most masterly digest of the science which has yet appeared." — Wittuts. 1 It may be sufficient here to say, that I do not use it in the vague and popular sense of “ whatsoever is the object of the understanding when a mail thinks;”* but 1 restrict it to its proper, original, and strictly-definitc signification in the Greek lan- guage, from which it is taken, of a law, or form of the mind, enabling 1 Univ. A strong instance of this is the misuse of the word idea, which I re came current from its use, in sheer ignorance, by Locke. And on the other hand, though a grammatical rule may at first sight appear to me plausible, and may even be borne out by several examples in the history of nations, yet if, on extending my researches, I find it occasionally contradicted by experience, its character of universality will be at an end, and I shall be forced to confess that, in assuming it to be universally correct, I had not fully comprehended the Idea of which I had supposed it to be a develop- ment 4.

E., Professor of Botany in the University of Edinburgh Third Edition, revised and enlarged by Joseph Wil- liams, M. 6 aaa, a tongue or language, and yoc, reason, sufficiently indicates that its office is to open forth the reasons and causes of diversity in the numberless modes by which men, in different parts of the world, give utterance to their droughts and feelings in speech. I have elsewhere fully explained what I mean by the word Idea, idea, as a basis of pure science. * In no instance has the false use of a word become current without some prac- tical ill consequence, of far greater moment than would pritno aspectu have been thought possible. If reflection suggest to me a grammatical principle, as involved in the idea of language, and I afterwards find that the same principle has been acted upon by men in all countries, and that it forms an essential part of the Grammar of every tongue, I may be assured that it is a law imposed on human nature by the All-wise Creator, and bears the stamp of infallible science. auec queltpiun signify- ing “to give up all intercourse with any one;” and, figuratively, to renounce the world. Of its origin and meaning different accounts are given.

Of the Poconchi, also in the state of Guatemala, a Grammar was composed by Gage (1655), and in this, as well as in the neighbouring Maya tongue, some words seem to be derived from a Finnish source. This circumstance (as my learned and experienced friend Mr. Where one renounced a right to prosecute another for the murder of a relation of the former, part of the proceeding was to break a festucaf So, where one renounced his right to certain lands — “ Cum festucd semet exnit prsedio.”* 66.

The Caraib language, remains of which are found (as I have observed) on the neighbouring mainland, was formerly spoken in all the smaller Antilles, and is said to be partially extant in Trinidad and Margarita: its affinity to some Polynesian tongues is maintained by M. 1 Proceeding to the mainland, we find a native language, the Kachikel, of which a Professorship was established in the University of Guatemala, and a Grammar and Dictionary compiled for teaching it. So he terminated the third person of the Imperfect with the Eolic »j instead of et, as hpi Xri for and frequently employed the Ionic forms, as ft tj for iftrj, t

Hence there are two arts, the vocal and the graphic, which require to be treated differently. Prior to the last age, few j K-rsons knew, or considered, whether the different modes of speech employed throughout the world could be reduced to any certain number ; much less, whether they could be arranged and classed in any rational order. Indeed, whatever classification may be adopted at present, the different gradations will be found to be intermixed and connected with each other by such various analogies, that any positive arrangement of them would be liable to perpetual disturbance. Bosworth’s interesting work on 4 The Origin of the English, German, and Scandinavian Languages’ (1848). In reviewing these, the classical Latin and Greek seem to Latin and claim the first notice ; but it will lie unnecessary to dwell much on Gre * k - them, as the literary discussions to which they have for several cen- turies given rise are well known.

D., Lecturer on Botany at the original School of Medicine, Dublin. " Perhaps the most masterly digest of the science which has yet appeared." — Wittuts. 1 It may be sufficient here to say, that I do not use it in the vague and popular sense of “ whatsoever is the object of the understanding when a mail thinks;”* but 1 restrict it to its proper, original, and strictly-definitc signification in the Greek lan- guage, from which it is taken, of a law, or form of the mind, enabling 1 Univ. A strong instance of this is the misuse of the word idea, which I re came current from its use, in sheer ignorance, by Locke. And on the other hand, though a grammatical rule may at first sight appear to me plausible, and may even be borne out by several examples in the history of nations, yet if, on extending my researches, I find it occasionally contradicted by experience, its character of universality will be at an end, and I shall be forced to confess that, in assuming it to be universally correct, I had not fully comprehended the Idea of which I had supposed it to be a develop- ment 4.

E., Professor of Botany in the University of Edinburgh Third Edition, revised and enlarged by Joseph Wil- liams, M. 6 aaa, a tongue or language, and yoc, reason, sufficiently indicates that its office is to open forth the reasons and causes of diversity in the numberless modes by which men, in different parts of the world, give utterance to their droughts and feelings in speech. I have elsewhere fully explained what I mean by the word Idea, idea, as a basis of pure science. * In no instance has the false use of a word become current without some prac- tical ill consequence, of far greater moment than would pritno aspectu have been thought possible. If reflection suggest to me a grammatical principle, as involved in the idea of language, and I afterwards find that the same principle has been acted upon by men in all countries, and that it forms an essential part of the Grammar of every tongue, I may be assured that it is a law imposed on human nature by the All-wise Creator, and bears the stamp of infallible science. auec queltpiun signify- ing “to give up all intercourse with any one;” and, figuratively, to renounce the world. Of its origin and meaning different accounts are given.

Of the Poconchi, also in the state of Guatemala, a Grammar was composed by Gage (1655), and in this, as well as in the neighbouring Maya tongue, some words seem to be derived from a Finnish source. This circumstance (as my learned and experienced friend Mr. Where one renounced a right to prosecute another for the murder of a relation of the former, part of the proceeding was to break a festucaf So, where one renounced his right to certain lands — “ Cum festucd semet exnit prsedio.”* 66.

The Caraib language, remains of which are found (as I have observed) on the neighbouring mainland, was formerly spoken in all the smaller Antilles, and is said to be partially extant in Trinidad and Margarita: its affinity to some Polynesian tongues is maintained by M. 1 Proceeding to the mainland, we find a native language, the Kachikel, of which a Professorship was established in the University of Guatemala, and a Grammar and Dictionary compiled for teaching it. So he terminated the third person of the Imperfect with the Eolic »j instead of et, as hpi Xri for and frequently employed the Ionic forms, as ft tj for iftrj, t

Hence there are two arts, the vocal and the graphic, which require to be treated differently. Prior to the last age, few j K-rsons knew, or considered, whether the different modes of speech employed throughout the world could be reduced to any certain number ; much less, whether they could be arranged and classed in any rational order. Indeed, whatever classification may be adopted at present, the different gradations will be found to be intermixed and connected with each other by such various analogies, that any positive arrangement of them would be liable to perpetual disturbance. Bosworth’s interesting work on 4 The Origin of the English, German, and Scandinavian Languages’ (1848). In reviewing these, the classical Latin and Greek seem to Latin and claim the first notice ; but it will lie unnecessary to dwell much on Gre * k - them, as the literary discussions to which they have for several cen- turies given rise are well known.

D., Lecturer on Botany at the original School of Medicine, Dublin. " Perhaps the most masterly digest of the science which has yet appeared." — Wittuts. 1 It may be sufficient here to say, that I do not use it in the vague and popular sense of “ whatsoever is the object of the understanding when a mail thinks;”* but 1 restrict it to its proper, original, and strictly-definitc signification in the Greek lan- guage, from which it is taken, of a law, or form of the mind, enabling 1 Univ. A strong instance of this is the misuse of the word idea, which I re came current from its use, in sheer ignorance, by Locke. And on the other hand, though a grammatical rule may at first sight appear to me plausible, and may even be borne out by several examples in the history of nations, yet if, on extending my researches, I find it occasionally contradicted by experience, its character of universality will be at an end, and I shall be forced to confess that, in assuming it to be universally correct, I had not fully comprehended the Idea of which I had supposed it to be a develop- ment 4.

E., Professor of Botany in the University of Edinburgh Third Edition, revised and enlarged by Joseph Wil- liams, M. 6 aaa, a tongue or language, and yoc, reason, sufficiently indicates that its office is to open forth the reasons and causes of diversity in the numberless modes by which men, in different parts of the world, give utterance to their droughts and feelings in speech. I have elsewhere fully explained what I mean by the word Idea, idea, as a basis of pure science. * In no instance has the false use of a word become current without some prac- tical ill consequence, of far greater moment than would pritno aspectu have been thought possible. If reflection suggest to me a grammatical principle, as involved in the idea of language, and I afterwards find that the same principle has been acted upon by men in all countries, and that it forms an essential part of the Grammar of every tongue, I may be assured that it is a law imposed on human nature by the All-wise Creator, and bears the stamp of infallible science. auec queltpiun signify- ing “to give up all intercourse with any one;” and, figuratively, to renounce the world. Of its origin and meaning different accounts are given.

Of the Poconchi, also in the state of Guatemala, a Grammar was composed by Gage (1655), and in this, as well as in the neighbouring Maya tongue, some words seem to be derived from a Finnish source. This circumstance (as my learned and experienced friend Mr. Where one renounced a right to prosecute another for the murder of a relation of the former, part of the proceeding was to break a festucaf So, where one renounced his right to certain lands — “ Cum festucd semet exnit prsedio.”* 66.

The Caraib language, remains of which are found (as I have observed) on the neighbouring mainland, was formerly spoken in all the smaller Antilles, and is said to be partially extant in Trinidad and Margarita: its affinity to some Polynesian tongues is maintained by M. 1 Proceeding to the mainland, we find a native language, the Kachikel, of which a Professorship was established in the University of Guatemala, and a Grammar and Dictionary compiled for teaching it. So he terminated the third person of the Imperfect with the Eolic »j instead of et, as hpi Xri for and frequently employed the Ionic forms, as ft tj for iftrj, t[[

Hence there are two arts, the vocal and the graphic, which require to be treated differently. Prior to the last age, few j K-rsons knew, or considered, whether the different modes of speech employed throughout the world could be reduced to any certain number ; much less, whether they could be arranged and classed in any rational order. Indeed, whatever classification may be adopted at present, the different gradations will be found to be intermixed and connected with each other by such various analogies, that any positive arrangement of them would be liable to perpetual disturbance. Bosworth’s interesting work on 4 The Origin of the English, German, and Scandinavian Languages’ (1848). In reviewing these, the classical Latin and Greek seem to Latin and claim the first notice ; but it will lie unnecessary to dwell much on Gre * k - them, as the literary discussions to which they have for several cen- turies given rise are well known.

D., Lecturer on Botany at the original School of Medicine, Dublin. " Perhaps the most masterly digest of the science which has yet appeared." — Wittuts. 1 It may be sufficient here to say, that I do not use it in the vague and popular sense of “ whatsoever is the object of the understanding when a mail thinks;”* but 1 restrict it to its proper, original, and strictly-definitc signification in the Greek lan- guage, from which it is taken, of a law, or form of the mind, enabling 1 Univ. A strong instance of this is the misuse of the word idea, which I re came current from its use, in sheer ignorance, by Locke. And on the other hand, though a grammatical rule may at first sight appear to me plausible, and may even be borne out by several examples in the history of nations, yet if, on extending my researches, I find it occasionally contradicted by experience, its character of universality will be at an end, and I shall be forced to confess that, in assuming it to be universally correct, I had not fully comprehended the Idea of which I had supposed it to be a develop- ment 4.

E., Professor of Botany in the University of Edinburgh Third Edition, revised and enlarged by Joseph Wil- liams, M. 6 aaa, a tongue or language, and \6yoc, reason, sufficiently indicates that its office is to open forth the reasons and causes of diversity in the numberless modes by which men, in different parts of the world, give utterance to their droughts and feelings in speech. I have elsewhere fully explained what I mean by the word Idea, idea, as a basis of pure science. * In no instance has the false use of a word become current without some prac- tical ill consequence, of far greater moment than would pritno aspectu have been thought possible. If reflection suggest to me a grammatical principle, as involved in the idea of language, and I afterwards find that the same principle has been acted upon by men in all countries, and that it forms an essential part of the Grammar of every tongue, I may be assured that it is a law imposed on human nature by the All-wise Creator, and bears the stamp of infallible science. auec queltpiun signify- ing “to give up all intercourse with any one;” and, figuratively, to renounce the world. Of its origin and meaning different accounts are given.

Of the Poconchi, also in the state of Guatemala, a Grammar was composed by Gage (1655), and in this, as well as in the neighbouring Maya tongue, some words seem to be derived from a Finnish source. This circumstance (as my learned and experienced friend Mr. Where one renounced a right to prosecute another for the murder of a relation of the former, part of the proceeding was to break a festucaf So, where one renounced his right to certain lands — “ Cum festucd semet exnit prsedio.”* 66.

The Caraib language, remains of which are found (as I have observed) on the neighbouring mainland, was formerly spoken in all the smaller Antilles, and is said to be partially extant in Trinidad and Margarita: its affinity to some Polynesian tongues is maintained by M. 1 Proceeding to the mainland, we find a native language, the Kachikel, of which a Professorship was established in the University of Guatemala, and a Grammar and Dictionary compiled for teaching it. So he terminated the third person of the Imperfect with the Eolic »j instead of et, as hpi Xri for and frequently employed the Ionic forms, as ft tj for iftrj, t\0r]oi for t\0r), voverov for voaov, "IIpij for "Hpo, &c. The Franks adopted a like symbol on various occasions.

Deprived of such guidance, all attempts to compare and classify languages, with reference to their excellences or defects, would be ' little better than groping in the dark. Yet Glossology, in its present state, opens a wide field for General interesting research. In regard to Nomenclature , I have elsewhere said, “it is my object to change as little as possible received modes of expression.” 1 The prac- tice of very eminent Glossologists, however, has varied in this par- ticular. With sincere respect for the abilities of this eminent Glossologist, I must confess that I cannot entirely acquiesce in this classification, at least as a definitive scheme.

||

Hence there are two arts, the vocal and the graphic, which require to be treated differently. Prior to the last age, few j K-rsons knew, or considered, whether the different modes of speech employed throughout the world could be reduced to any certain number ; much less, whether they could be arranged and classed in any rational order. Indeed, whatever classification may be adopted at present, the different gradations will be found to be intermixed and connected with each other by such various analogies, that any positive arrangement of them would be liable to perpetual disturbance. Bosworth’s interesting work on 4 The Origin of the English, German, and Scandinavian Languages’ (1848). In reviewing these, the classical Latin and Greek seem to Latin and claim the first notice ; but it will lie unnecessary to dwell much on Gre * k - them, as the literary discussions to which they have for several cen- turies given rise are well known. D., Lecturer on Botany at the original School of Medicine, Dublin. " Perhaps the most masterly digest of the science which has yet appeared." — Wittuts. 1 It may be sufficient here to say, that I do not use it in the vague and popular sense of “ whatsoever is the object of the understanding when a mail thinks;”* but 1 restrict it to its proper, original, and strictly-definitc signification in the Greek lan- guage, from which it is taken, of a law, or form of the mind, enabling 1 Univ. A strong instance of this is the misuse of the word idea, which I re came current from its use, in sheer ignorance, by Locke. And on the other hand, though a grammatical rule may at first sight appear to me plausible, and may even be borne out by several examples in the history of nations, yet if, on extending my researches, I find it occasionally contradicted by experience, its character of universality will be at an end, and I shall be forced to confess that, in assuming it to be universally correct, I had not fully comprehended the Idea of which I had supposed it to be a develop- ment 4. E., Professor of Botany in the University of Edinburgh Third Edition, revised and enlarged by Joseph Wil- liams, M. 6 aaa, a tongue or language, and \6yoc, reason, sufficiently indicates that its office is to open forth the reasons and causes of diversity in the numberless modes by which men, in different parts of the world, give utterance to their droughts and feelings in speech. I have elsewhere fully explained what I mean by the word Idea, idea, as a basis of pure science. * In no instance has the false use of a word become current without some prac- tical ill consequence, of far greater moment than would pritno aspectu have been thought possible. If reflection suggest to me a grammatical principle, as involved in the idea of language, and I afterwards find that the same principle has been acted upon by men in all countries, and that it forms an essential part of the Grammar of every tongue, I may be assured that it is a law imposed on human nature by the All-wise Creator, and bears the stamp of infallible science. auec queltpiun signify- ing “to give up all intercourse with any one;” and, figuratively, to renounce the world. Of its origin and meaning different accounts are given. Of the Poconchi, also in the state of Guatemala, a Grammar was composed by Gage (1655), and in this, as well as in the neighbouring Maya tongue, some words seem to be derived from a Finnish source. This circumstance (as my learned and experienced friend Mr. Where one renounced a right to prosecute another for the murder of a relation of the former, part of the proceeding was to break a festucaf So, where one renounced his right to certain lands — “ Cum festucd semet exnit prsedio.”* 66. The Caraib language, remains of which are found (as I have observed) on the neighbouring mainland, was formerly spoken in all the smaller Antilles, and is said to be partially extant in Trinidad and Margarita: its affinity to some Polynesian tongues is maintained by M. 1 Proceeding to the mainland, we find a native language, the Kachikel, of which a Professorship was established in the University of Guatemala, and a Grammar and Dictionary compiled for teaching it. So he terminated the third person of the Imperfect with the Eolic »j instead of et, as hpi Xri for and frequently employed the Ionic forms, as ft tj for iftrj, t\0r]oi for t\0r), voverov for voaov, "IIpij for "Hpo, &c. The Franks adopted a like symbol on various occasions. Deprived of such guidance, all attempts to compare and classify languages, with reference to their excellences or defects, would be ' little better than groping in the dark. Yet Glossology, in its present state, opens a wide field for General interesting research. In regard to Nomenclature , I have elsewhere said, “it is my object to change as little as possible received modes of expression.” 1 The prac- tice of very eminent Glossologists, however, has varied in this par- ticular. With sincere respect for the abilities of this eminent Glossologist, I must confess that I cannot entirely acquiesce in this classification, at least as a definitive scheme.

]]r]oi for t[[

Hence there are two arts, the vocal and the graphic, which require to be treated differently. Prior to the last age, few j K-rsons knew, or considered, whether the different modes of speech employed throughout the world could be reduced to any certain number ; much less, whether they could be arranged and classed in any rational order. Indeed, whatever classification may be adopted at present, the different gradations will be found to be intermixed and connected with each other by such various analogies, that any positive arrangement of them would be liable to perpetual disturbance. Bosworth’s interesting work on 4 The Origin of the English, German, and Scandinavian Languages’ (1848). In reviewing these, the classical Latin and Greek seem to Latin and claim the first notice ; but it will lie unnecessary to dwell much on Gre * k - them, as the literary discussions to which they have for several cen- turies given rise are well known.

D., Lecturer on Botany at the original School of Medicine, Dublin. " Perhaps the most masterly digest of the science which has yet appeared." — Wittuts. 1 It may be sufficient here to say, that I do not use it in the vague and popular sense of “ whatsoever is the object of the understanding when a mail thinks;”* but 1 restrict it to its proper, original, and strictly-definitc signification in the Greek lan- guage, from which it is taken, of a law, or form of the mind, enabling 1 Univ. A strong instance of this is the misuse of the word idea, which I re came current from its use, in sheer ignorance, by Locke. And on the other hand, though a grammatical rule may at first sight appear to me plausible, and may even be borne out by several examples in the history of nations, yet if, on extending my researches, I find it occasionally contradicted by experience, its character of universality will be at an end, and I shall be forced to confess that, in assuming it to be universally correct, I had not fully comprehended the Idea of which I had supposed it to be a develop- ment 4.

E., Professor of Botany in the University of Edinburgh Third Edition, revised and enlarged by Joseph Wil- liams, M. 6 aaa, a tongue or language, and \6yoc, reason, sufficiently indicates that its office is to open forth the reasons and causes of diversity in the numberless modes by which men, in different parts of the world, give utterance to their droughts and feelings in speech. I have elsewhere fully explained what I mean by the word Idea, idea, as a basis of pure science. * In no instance has the false use of a word become current without some prac- tical ill consequence, of far greater moment than would pritno aspectu have been thought possible. If reflection suggest to me a grammatical principle, as involved in the idea of language, and I afterwards find that the same principle has been acted upon by men in all countries, and that it forms an essential part of the Grammar of every tongue, I may be assured that it is a law imposed on human nature by the All-wise Creator, and bears the stamp of infallible science. auec queltpiun signify- ing “to give up all intercourse with any one;” and, figuratively, to renounce the world. Of its origin and meaning different accounts are given.

Of the Poconchi, also in the state of Guatemala, a Grammar was composed by Gage (1655), and in this, as well as in the neighbouring Maya tongue, some words seem to be derived from a Finnish source. This circumstance (as my learned and experienced friend Mr. Where one renounced a right to prosecute another for the murder of a relation of the former, part of the proceeding was to break a festucaf So, where one renounced his right to certain lands — “ Cum festucd semet exnit prsedio.”* 66.

The Caraib language, remains of which are found (as I have observed) on the neighbouring mainland, was formerly spoken in all the smaller Antilles, and is said to be partially extant in Trinidad and Margarita: its affinity to some Polynesian tongues is maintained by M. 1 Proceeding to the mainland, we find a native language, the Kachikel, of which a Professorship was established in the University of Guatemala, and a Grammar and Dictionary compiled for teaching it. So he terminated the third person of the Imperfect with the Eolic »j instead of et, as hpi Xri for and frequently employed the Ionic forms, as ft tj for iftrj, t\0r]oi for t\0r), voverov for voaov, "IIpij for "Hpo, &c. The Franks adopted a like symbol on various occasions.

Deprived of such guidance, all attempts to compare and classify languages, with reference to their excellences or defects, would be ' little better than groping in the dark. Yet Glossology, in its present state, opens a wide field for General interesting research. In regard to Nomenclature , I have elsewhere said, “it is my object to change as little as possible received modes of expression.” 1 The prac- tice of very eminent Glossologists, however, has varied in this par- ticular. With sincere respect for the abilities of this eminent Glossologist, I must confess that I cannot entirely acquiesce in this classification, at least as a definitive scheme.

||

Hence there are two arts, the vocal and the graphic, which require to be treated differently. Prior to the last age, few j K-rsons knew, or considered, whether the different modes of speech employed throughout the world could be reduced to any certain number ; much less, whether they could be arranged and classed in any rational order. Indeed, whatever classification may be adopted at present, the different gradations will be found to be intermixed and connected with each other by such various analogies, that any positive arrangement of them would be liable to perpetual disturbance. Bosworth’s interesting work on 4 The Origin of the English, German, and Scandinavian Languages’ (1848). In reviewing these, the classical Latin and Greek seem to Latin and claim the first notice ; but it will lie unnecessary to dwell much on Gre * k - them, as the literary discussions to which they have for several cen- turies given rise are well known. D., Lecturer on Botany at the original School of Medicine, Dublin. " Perhaps the most masterly digest of the science which has yet appeared." — Wittuts. 1 It may be sufficient here to say, that I do not use it in the vague and popular sense of “ whatsoever is the object of the understanding when a mail thinks;”* but 1 restrict it to its proper, original, and strictly-definitc signification in the Greek lan- guage, from which it is taken, of a law, or form of the mind, enabling 1 Univ. A strong instance of this is the misuse of the word idea, which I re came current from its use, in sheer ignorance, by Locke. And on the other hand, though a grammatical rule may at first sight appear to me plausible, and may even be borne out by several examples in the history of nations, yet if, on extending my researches, I find it occasionally contradicted by experience, its character of universality will be at an end, and I shall be forced to confess that, in assuming it to be universally correct, I had not fully comprehended the Idea of which I had supposed it to be a develop- ment 4. E., Professor of Botany in the University of Edinburgh Third Edition, revised and enlarged by Joseph Wil- liams, M. 6 aaa, a tongue or language, and \6yoc, reason, sufficiently indicates that its office is to open forth the reasons and causes of diversity in the numberless modes by which men, in different parts of the world, give utterance to their droughts and feelings in speech. I have elsewhere fully explained what I mean by the word Idea, idea, as a basis of pure science. * In no instance has the false use of a word become current without some prac- tical ill consequence, of far greater moment than would pritno aspectu have been thought possible. If reflection suggest to me a grammatical principle, as involved in the idea of language, and I afterwards find that the same principle has been acted upon by men in all countries, and that it forms an essential part of the Grammar of every tongue, I may be assured that it is a law imposed on human nature by the All-wise Creator, and bears the stamp of infallible science. auec queltpiun signify- ing “to give up all intercourse with any one;” and, figuratively, to renounce the world. Of its origin and meaning different accounts are given. Of the Poconchi, also in the state of Guatemala, a Grammar was composed by Gage (1655), and in this, as well as in the neighbouring Maya tongue, some words seem to be derived from a Finnish source. This circumstance (as my learned and experienced friend Mr. Where one renounced a right to prosecute another for the murder of a relation of the former, part of the proceeding was to break a festucaf So, where one renounced his right to certain lands — “ Cum festucd semet exnit prsedio.”* 66. The Caraib language, remains of which are found (as I have observed) on the neighbouring mainland, was formerly spoken in all the smaller Antilles, and is said to be partially extant in Trinidad and Margarita: its affinity to some Polynesian tongues is maintained by M. 1 Proceeding to the mainland, we find a native language, the Kachikel, of which a Professorship was established in the University of Guatemala, and a Grammar and Dictionary compiled for teaching it. So he terminated the third person of the Imperfect with the Eolic »j instead of et, as hpi Xri for and frequently employed the Ionic forms, as ft tj for iftrj, t\0r]oi for t\0r), voverov for voaov, "IIpij for "Hpo, &c. The Franks adopted a like symbol on various occasions. Deprived of such guidance, all attempts to compare and classify languages, with reference to their excellences or defects, would be ' little better than groping in the dark. Yet Glossology, in its present state, opens a wide field for General interesting research. In regard to Nomenclature , I have elsewhere said, “it is my object to change as little as possible received modes of expression.” 1 The prac- tice of very eminent Glossologists, however, has varied in this par- ticular. With sincere respect for the abilities of this eminent Glossologist, I must confess that I cannot entirely acquiesce in this classification, at least as a definitive scheme.

]]r), voverov for voaov, "IIpij for "Hpo, &c. The Franks adopted a like symbol on various occasions.

Deprived of such guidance, all attempts to compare and classify languages, with reference to their excellences or defects, would be ' little better than groping in the dark. Yet Glossology, in its present state, opens a wide field for General interesting research. In regard to Nomenclature , I have elsewhere said, “it is my object to change as little as possible received modes of expression.” 1 The prac- tice of very eminent Glossologists, however, has varied in this par- ticular. With sincere respect for the abilities of this eminent Glossologist, I must confess that I cannot entirely acquiesce in this classification, at least as a definitive scheme.

r]oi for t[[

Hence there are two arts, the vocal and the graphic, which require to be treated differently. Prior to the last age, few j K-rsons knew, or considered, whether the different modes of speech employed throughout the world could be reduced to any certain number ; much less, whether they could be arranged and classed in any rational order. Indeed, whatever classification may be adopted at present, the different gradations will be found to be intermixed and connected with each other by such various analogies, that any positive arrangement of them would be liable to perpetual disturbance. Bosworth’s interesting work on 4 The Origin of the English, German, and Scandinavian Languages’ (1848). In reviewing these, the classical Latin and Greek seem to Latin and claim the first notice ; but it will lie unnecessary to dwell much on Gre * k - them, as the literary discussions to which they have for several cen- turies given rise are well known.

D., Lecturer on Botany at the original School of Medicine, Dublin. " Perhaps the most masterly digest of the science which has yet appeared." — Wittuts. 1 It may be sufficient here to say, that I do not use it in the vague and popular sense of “ whatsoever is the object of the understanding when a mail thinks;”* but 1 restrict it to its proper, original, and strictly-definitc signification in the Greek lan- guage, from which it is taken, of a law, or form of the mind, enabling 1 Univ. A strong instance of this is the misuse of the word idea, which I re came current from its use, in sheer ignorance, by Locke. And on the other hand, though a grammatical rule may at first sight appear to me plausible, and may even be borne out by several examples in the history of nations, yet if, on extending my researches, I find it occasionally contradicted by experience, its character of universality will be at an end, and I shall be forced to confess that, in assuming it to be universally correct, I had not fully comprehended the Idea of which I had supposed it to be a develop- ment 4.

E., Professor of Botany in the University of Edinburgh Third Edition, revised and enlarged by Joseph Wil- liams, M. 6 aaa, a tongue or language, and \6yoc, reason, sufficiently indicates that its office is to open forth the reasons and causes of diversity in the numberless modes by which men, in different parts of the world, give utterance to their droughts and feelings in speech. I have elsewhere fully explained what I mean by the word Idea, idea, as a basis of pure science. * In no instance has the false use of a word become current without some prac- tical ill consequence, of far greater moment than would pritno aspectu have been thought possible. If reflection suggest to me a grammatical principle, as involved in the idea of language, and I afterwards find that the same principle has been acted upon by men in all countries, and that it forms an essential part of the Grammar of every tongue, I may be assured that it is a law imposed on human nature by the All-wise Creator, and bears the stamp of infallible science. auec queltpiun signify- ing “to give up all intercourse with any one;” and, figuratively, to renounce the world. Of its origin and meaning different accounts are given.

Of the Poconchi, also in the state of Guatemala, a Grammar was composed by Gage (1655), and in this, as well as in the neighbouring Maya tongue, some words seem to be derived from a Finnish source. This circumstance (as my learned and experienced friend Mr. Where one renounced a right to prosecute another for the murder of a relation of the former, part of the proceeding was to break a festucaf So, where one renounced his right to certain lands — “ Cum festucd semet exnit prsedio.”* 66.

The Caraib language, remains of which are found (as I have observed) on the neighbouring mainland, was formerly spoken in all the smaller Antilles, and is said to be partially extant in Trinidad and Margarita: its affinity to some Polynesian tongues is maintained by M. 1 Proceeding to the mainland, we find a native language, the Kachikel, of which a Professorship was established in the University of Guatemala, and a Grammar and Dictionary compiled for teaching it. So he terminated the third person of the Imperfect with the Eolic »j instead of et, as hpi Xri for and frequently employed the Ionic forms, as ft tj for iftrj, t\0r]oi for t\0r), voverov for voaov, "IIpij for "Hpo, &c. The Franks adopted a like symbol on various occasions.

Deprived of such guidance, all attempts to compare and classify languages, with reference to their excellences or defects, would be ' little better than groping in the dark. Yet Glossology, in its present state, opens a wide field for General interesting research. In regard to Nomenclature , I have elsewhere said, “it is my object to change as little as possible received modes of expression.” 1 The prac- tice of very eminent Glossologists, however, has varied in this par- ticular. With sincere respect for the abilities of this eminent Glossologist, I must confess that I cannot entirely acquiesce in this classification, at least as a definitive scheme.

||

Hence there are two arts, the vocal and the graphic, which require to be treated differently. Prior to the last age, few j K-rsons knew, or considered, whether the different modes of speech employed throughout the world could be reduced to any certain number ; much less, whether they could be arranged and classed in any rational order. Indeed, whatever classification may be adopted at present, the different gradations will be found to be intermixed and connected with each other by such various analogies, that any positive arrangement of them would be liable to perpetual disturbance. Bosworth’s interesting work on 4 The Origin of the English, German, and Scandinavian Languages’ (1848). In reviewing these, the classical Latin and Greek seem to Latin and claim the first notice ; but it will lie unnecessary to dwell much on Gre * k - them, as the literary discussions to which they have for several cen- turies given rise are well known. D., Lecturer on Botany at the original School of Medicine, Dublin. " Perhaps the most masterly digest of the science which has yet appeared." — Wittuts. 1 It may be sufficient here to say, that I do not use it in the vague and popular sense of “ whatsoever is the object of the understanding when a mail thinks;”* but 1 restrict it to its proper, original, and strictly-definitc signification in the Greek lan- guage, from which it is taken, of a law, or form of the mind, enabling 1 Univ. A strong instance of this is the misuse of the word idea, which I re came current from its use, in sheer ignorance, by Locke. And on the other hand, though a grammatical rule may at first sight appear to me plausible, and may even be borne out by several examples in the history of nations, yet if, on extending my researches, I find it occasionally contradicted by experience, its character of universality will be at an end, and I shall be forced to confess that, in assuming it to be universally correct, I had not fully comprehended the Idea of which I had supposed it to be a develop- ment 4. E., Professor of Botany in the University of Edinburgh Third Edition, revised and enlarged by Joseph Wil- liams, M. 6 aaa, a tongue or language, and \6yoc, reason, sufficiently indicates that its office is to open forth the reasons and causes of diversity in the numberless modes by which men, in different parts of the world, give utterance to their droughts and feelings in speech. I have elsewhere fully explained what I mean by the word Idea, idea, as a basis of pure science. * In no instance has the false use of a word become current without some prac- tical ill consequence, of far greater moment than would pritno aspectu have been thought possible. If reflection suggest to me a grammatical principle, as involved in the idea of language, and I afterwards find that the same principle has been acted upon by men in all countries, and that it forms an essential part of the Grammar of every tongue, I may be assured that it is a law imposed on human nature by the All-wise Creator, and bears the stamp of infallible science. auec queltpiun signify- ing “to give up all intercourse with any one;” and, figuratively, to renounce the world. Of its origin and meaning different accounts are given. Of the Poconchi, also in the state of Guatemala, a Grammar was composed by Gage (1655), and in this, as well as in the neighbouring Maya tongue, some words seem to be derived from a Finnish source. This circumstance (as my learned and experienced friend Mr. Where one renounced a right to prosecute another for the murder of a relation of the former, part of the proceeding was to break a festucaf So, where one renounced his right to certain lands — “ Cum festucd semet exnit prsedio.”* 66. The Caraib language, remains of which are found (as I have observed) on the neighbouring mainland, was formerly spoken in all the smaller Antilles, and is said to be partially extant in Trinidad and Margarita: its affinity to some Polynesian tongues is maintained by M. 1 Proceeding to the mainland, we find a native language, the Kachikel, of which a Professorship was established in the University of Guatemala, and a Grammar and Dictionary compiled for teaching it. So he terminated the third person of the Imperfect with the Eolic »j instead of et, as hpi Xri for and frequently employed the Ionic forms, as ft tj for iftrj, t\0r]oi for t\0r), voverov for voaov, "IIpij for "Hpo, &c. The Franks adopted a like symbol on various occasions. Deprived of such guidance, all attempts to compare and classify languages, with reference to their excellences or defects, would be ' little better than groping in the dark. Yet Glossology, in its present state, opens a wide field for General interesting research. In regard to Nomenclature , I have elsewhere said, “it is my object to change as little as possible received modes of expression.” 1 The prac- tice of very eminent Glossologists, however, has varied in this par- ticular. With sincere respect for the abilities of this eminent Glossologist, I must confess that I cannot entirely acquiesce in this classification, at least as a definitive scheme.

]]r), voverov for voaov, "IIpij for "Hpo, &c. The Franks adopted a like symbol on various occasions.

Deprived of such guidance, all attempts to compare and classify languages, with reference to their excellences or defects, would be ' little better than groping in the dark. Yet Glossology, in its present state, opens a wide field for General interesting research. In regard to Nomenclature , I have elsewhere said, “it is my object to change as little as possible received modes of expression.” 1 The prac- tice of very eminent Glossologists, however, has varied in this par- ticular. With sincere respect for the abilities of this eminent Glossologist, I must confess that I cannot entirely acquiesce in this classification, at least as a definitive scheme.

r]oi for t[[

Hence there are two arts, the vocal and the graphic, which require to be treated differently. Prior to the last age, few j K-rsons knew, or considered, whether the different modes of speech employed throughout the world could be reduced to any certain number ; much less, whether they could be arranged and classed in any rational order. Indeed, whatever classification may be adopted at present, the different gradations will be found to be intermixed and connected with each other by such various analogies, that any positive arrangement of them would be liable to perpetual disturbance. Bosworth’s interesting work on 4 The Origin of the English, German, and Scandinavian Languages’ (1848). In reviewing these, the classical Latin and Greek seem to Latin and claim the first notice ; but it will lie unnecessary to dwell much on Gre * k - them, as the literary discussions to which they have for several cen- turies given rise are well known.

D., Lecturer on Botany at the original School of Medicine, Dublin. " Perhaps the most masterly digest of the science which has yet appeared." — Wittuts. 1 It may be sufficient here to say, that I do not use it in the vague and popular sense of “ whatsoever is the object of the understanding when a mail thinks;”* but 1 restrict it to its proper, original, and strictly-definitc signification in the Greek lan- guage, from which it is taken, of a law, or form of the mind, enabling 1 Univ. A strong instance of this is the misuse of the word idea, which I re came current from its use, in sheer ignorance, by Locke. And on the other hand, though a grammatical rule may at first sight appear to me plausible, and may even be borne out by several examples in the history of nations, yet if, on extending my researches, I find it occasionally contradicted by experience, its character of universality will be at an end, and I shall be forced to confess that, in assuming it to be universally correct, I had not fully comprehended the Idea of which I had supposed it to be a develop- ment 4.

E., Professor of Botany in the University of Edinburgh Third Edition, revised and enlarged by Joseph Wil- liams, M. 6 aaa, a tongue or language, and \6yoc, reason, sufficiently indicates that its office is to open forth the reasons and causes of diversity in the numberless modes by which men, in different parts of the world, give utterance to their droughts and feelings in speech. I have elsewhere fully explained what I mean by the word Idea, idea, as a basis of pure science. * In no instance has the false use of a word become current without some prac- tical ill consequence, of far greater moment than would pritno aspectu have been thought possible. If reflection suggest to me a grammatical principle, as involved in the idea of language, and I afterwards find that the same principle has been acted upon by men in all countries, and that it forms an essential part of the Grammar of every tongue, I may be assured that it is a law imposed on human nature by the All-wise Creator, and bears the stamp of infallible science. auec queltpiun signify- ing “to give up all intercourse with any one;” and, figuratively, to renounce the world. Of its origin and meaning different accounts are given.

Of the Poconchi, also in the state of Guatemala, a Grammar was composed by Gage (1655), and in this, as well as in the neighbouring Maya tongue, some words seem to be derived from a Finnish source. This circumstance (as my learned and experienced friend Mr. Where one renounced a right to prosecute another for the murder of a relation of the former, part of the proceeding was to break a festucaf So, where one renounced his right to certain lands — “ Cum festucd semet exnit prsedio.”* 66.

The Caraib language, remains of which are found (as I have observed) on the neighbouring mainland, was formerly spoken in all the smaller Antilles, and is said to be partially extant in Trinidad and Margarita: its affinity to some Polynesian tongues is maintained by M. 1 Proceeding to the mainland, we find a native language, the Kachikel, of which a Professorship was established in the University of Guatemala, and a Grammar and Dictionary compiled for teaching it. So he terminated the third person of the Imperfect with the Eolic »j instead of et, as hpi Xri for and frequently employed the Ionic forms, as ft tj for iftrj, t\0r]oi for t\0r), voverov for voaov, "IIpij for "Hpo, &c. The Franks adopted a like symbol on various occasions.

Deprived of such guidance, all attempts to compare and classify languages, with reference to their excellences or defects, would be ' little better than groping in the dark. Yet Glossology, in its present state, opens a wide field for General interesting research. In regard to Nomenclature , I have elsewhere said, “it is my object to change as little as possible received modes of expression.” 1 The prac- tice of very eminent Glossologists, however, has varied in this par- ticular. With sincere respect for the abilities of this eminent Glossologist, I must confess that I cannot entirely acquiesce in this classification, at least as a definitive scheme.

||

Hence there are two arts, the vocal and the graphic, which require to be treated differently. Prior to the last age, few j K-rsons knew, or considered, whether the different modes of speech employed throughout the world could be reduced to any certain number ; much less, whether they could be arranged and classed in any rational order. Indeed, whatever classification may be adopted at present, the different gradations will be found to be intermixed and connected with each other by such various analogies, that any positive arrangement of them would be liable to perpetual disturbance. Bosworth’s interesting work on 4 The Origin of the English, German, and Scandinavian Languages’ (1848). In reviewing these, the classical Latin and Greek seem to Latin and claim the first notice ; but it will lie unnecessary to dwell much on Gre * k - them, as the literary discussions to which they have for several cen- turies given rise are well known. D., Lecturer on Botany at the original School of Medicine, Dublin. " Perhaps the most masterly digest of the science which has yet appeared." — Wittuts. 1 It may be sufficient here to say, that I do not use it in the vague and popular sense of “ whatsoever is the object of the understanding when a mail thinks;”* but 1 restrict it to its proper, original, and strictly-definitc signification in the Greek lan- guage, from which it is taken, of a law, or form of the mind, enabling 1 Univ. A strong instance of this is the misuse of the word idea, which I re came current from its use, in sheer ignorance, by Locke. And on the other hand, though a grammatical rule may at first sight appear to me plausible, and may even be borne out by several examples in the history of nations, yet if, on extending my researches, I find it occasionally contradicted by experience, its character of universality will be at an end, and I shall be forced to confess that, in assuming it to be universally correct, I had not fully comprehended the Idea of which I had supposed it to be a develop- ment 4. E., Professor of Botany in the University of Edinburgh Third Edition, revised and enlarged by Joseph Wil- liams, M. 6 aaa, a tongue or language, and \6yoc, reason, sufficiently indicates that its office is to open forth the reasons and causes of diversity in the numberless modes by which men, in different parts of the world, give utterance to their droughts and feelings in speech. I have elsewhere fully explained what I mean by the word Idea, idea, as a basis of pure science. * In no instance has the false use of a word become current without some prac- tical ill consequence, of far greater moment than would pritno aspectu have been thought possible. If reflection suggest to me a grammatical principle, as involved in the idea of language, and I afterwards find that the same principle has been acted upon by men in all countries, and that it forms an essential part of the Grammar of every tongue, I may be assured that it is a law imposed on human nature by the All-wise Creator, and bears the stamp of infallible science. auec queltpiun signify- ing “to give up all intercourse with any one;” and, figuratively, to renounce the world. Of its origin and meaning different accounts are given. Of the Poconchi, also in the state of Guatemala, a Grammar was composed by Gage (1655), and in this, as well as in the neighbouring Maya tongue, some words seem to be derived from a Finnish source. This circumstance (as my learned and experienced friend Mr. Where one renounced a right to prosecute another for the murder of a relation of the former, part of the proceeding was to break a festucaf So, where one renounced his right to certain lands — “ Cum festucd semet exnit prsedio.”* 66. The Caraib language, remains of which are found (as I have observed) on the neighbouring mainland, was formerly spoken in all the smaller Antilles, and is said to be partially extant in Trinidad and Margarita: its affinity to some Polynesian tongues is maintained by M. 1 Proceeding to the mainland, we find a native language, the Kachikel, of which a Professorship was established in the University of Guatemala, and a Grammar and Dictionary compiled for teaching it. So he terminated the third person of the Imperfect with the Eolic »j instead of et, as hpi Xri for and frequently employed the Ionic forms, as ft tj for iftrj, t\0r]oi for t\0r), voverov for voaov, "IIpij for "Hpo, &c. The Franks adopted a like symbol on various occasions. Deprived of such guidance, all attempts to compare and classify languages, with reference to their excellences or defects, would be ' little better than groping in the dark. Yet Glossology, in its present state, opens a wide field for General interesting research. In regard to Nomenclature , I have elsewhere said, “it is my object to change as little as possible received modes of expression.” 1 The prac- tice of very eminent Glossologists, however, has varied in this par- ticular. With sincere respect for the abilities of this eminent Glossologist, I must confess that I cannot entirely acquiesce in this classification, at least as a definitive scheme.

]]r), voverov for voaov, "IIpij for "Hpo, &c. The Franks adopted a like symbol on various occasions.

Deprived of such guidance, all attempts to compare and classify languages, with reference to their excellences or defects, would be ' little better than groping in the dark. Yet Glossology, in its present state, opens a wide field for General interesting research. In regard to Nomenclature , I have elsewhere said, “it is my object to change as little as possible received modes of expression.” 1 The prac- tice of very eminent Glossologists, however, has varied in this par- ticular. With sincere respect for the abilities of this eminent Glossologist, I must confess that I cannot entirely acquiesce in this classification, at least as a definitive scheme.

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