Dating staffordshire pottery

28-Mar-2020 00:12 by 5 Comments

Dating staffordshire pottery

Similarly, there is little evidence for tools used. were probably employed, but these would be difficult to distinguish from domestic ones.Also, specialized antler and bone tools and stamps were used to decorate pottery, and a few of these have been found.

Fine vessels with incised and stamped decoration were also made. C., wheelmade pottery was being imported from the Roman world and finer 'Belgic-type' vessels were being produced in East Anglia.The following is a basic introduction to pottery in archaeology, focusing particularly on the ceramics of the medieval period.The bibliography at the end provides references to more detailed and comprehensive sources.The study of pottery is an important branch of archaeology.This is because pottery is: Small fragments of pottery, known as sherds or potsherds, are collected on most archaeological sites.These have provided us with information on what could and couldn't work, and are useful for interpreting the remains of structures in the ground.

The single flue type was in use from the Late Saxon period to the 13th c., and was superseded by the double flue type.

Most Roman pottery, however, consisted of coarse sandy greywares which were used for cooking, storage and other daily functions.

By the early 5th century, the art of pottery manufacture with a wheel had been lost (or was simply not required) in Britain.

Early Saxon pottery (5th to 7th century) was handmade, often locally produced and fired in clamps or bonfires.

Forms produced included simple cooking pots and bowls, lamps and highly decorated 'urns' with incised lines and stamps in panels.

Multi-flue types were also used later, allowing greater capacity and needing peat or coal as fuel.