1930s dating tips

25-Dec-2019 03:38 by 5 Comments

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1930s-1940s: Bakelite buttons are plastic buttons found on 1930s and 1940s garments.Bakelite was invented in 1909 as the first ever synthetic plastic.

Your search comes up empty, so you turn the garment inside out to look along the side or bottom seam.WHY IT’S VINTAGE: Read more on identifying and dating the age of ILGWU union labels here, and how to date vintage clothing based on 6 other vintage union labels in addition to ILGWU here. Although clearly for a male named Sam Davis, I just about died when I saw this tag on a men’s jacket in The Family Vintage Jewels, who kindly let us shoot the tags of their vintage clothing! I wrote about eight easy ways to identify your garment as vintage, which helped you to recognize whether that great maxi dress you thrifted was actually from the ’70s or was just a 2012 lookalike.You know a button is bakelite plastic versus a more modern synthetic plastic because it’s almost always colored.Test a button’s bakelite authenticity by spraying a Q-tip with 409 cleaner and rubbing it against the button. 1950s: If the button is clear, you’re most likely looking at lucite, a transparent type of plastic invented in 1931.Also, for more vintage geographic know-how read more about the influences of California & Hawaii in my Dating Clothing as Vintage article. WHY IT’S VINTAGE: Read more on how to date vintage by its care label here. a union label, either from the International Ladies’ Garment Workers’ Union (ILGWU) or from one of the other 6 unions or union subgroups, including HOW OLD?

Typically 1920s to 1980s, depending on the tag design you’re looking at. Well you know it’s vintage cause it has my name on it!

A zipper in the ’30s would most likely be found along the side seam and is always metal.

1940s: The zipper is accepted in women’s clothing, horray!

) Feel free to scroll through the post to read these 13 tips for using your garment’s tag to help identify its vintage era, or click any of the links below to be taken immediately to the text within the article! WHY IT’S VINTAGE: If you’ve got a garment with a copyright year of 1992 or earlier, then by industry definition you’ve got yourself a huge piece of the puzzle dating your garment as vintage! WHY IT’S VINTAGE: The Woolmark logo was first placed on the tags of wool clothing in 1964 as a marketing technique to encourage consumers to buy the natural fiber of wool over synthetics polyester and acrylic. Pre-1999, considering the British Colony of Hong Kong gained its independence before the dawn of the new millennium. the use of “half” sizes with 1/2 after the whole number size, i.e. The sizing was with an even whole number and “1/2” because odd numbers were denoted for junior sizing (at that time, petite women and not teenagers).

NOTE: Because the Woolmark logo is licensed and therefore costs money to use, not all garments made from wool are labeled with a Woolmark. WHY IT’S VINTAGE: While dating a garment to 1999 doesn’t make it vintage, you can date garments with countries like “Yugoslavia,” which divided into Bosnia, Croatia, Macedonia, Serbia and Montenegro, and Slovenia in the early 1990s. My other source references half sizes as indicators of a vintage plus-size garment beginning at size 20 1/2.

RESOURCE: The Vintage Fashion Guild’s Woolmark guide. the type of material noted on a garment, particularly if it has an unusual name like “Dacron Polyester.” HOW OLD? WHY IT’S VINTAGE: The invention of synthetics during World War II was an exciting time for American fashion — and for the clothing companies themselves! RESOURCES: Explanation of Half Sizes on Sewing Patterns by The Hem Line & Explanation of Vintage Plus Sizes by Charearl. an RN number of five to six numbers, proceeded with “RN.” HOW OLD?